Reducer question.

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Pinger
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Reducer question.

#1 Post by Pinger » Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:16 pm

A hypothetical (though possibly practical if it has been addressed in the context of forced induction) question.

Assume that a reducer with its reference port open to atmosphere is adjusted to deliver its output gas at atmospheric pressure. If it's reference port is now subjected to above atmospheric pressure, does the output pressure increase linearly? Eg, would 0.25 bar applied at the reference port raise output pressure to 0.25 bar, would 0.5 bar applied at the reference port raise output pressure to 0.5 bar, etc?

Gilbertd
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Re: Reducer question.

#2 Post by Gilbertd » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:40 pm

Yes, if you look you'll find vaporisers intended for forced induction systems marked as Turbo vaporisers (this one https://tinleytech.co.uk/shop/lpg-parts ... o-reducer/ is the forced induction version of this one https://tinleytech.co.uk/shop/lpg-parts ... vaporiser/). The difference being that rather than one side of the diaphragm being open to atmosphere, it is connected to the intake.
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Pinger
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Re: Reducer question.

#3 Post by Pinger » Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:46 pm

Gilbertd wrote:
Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:40 pm
Yes, if you look you'll find vaporisers intended for forced induction systems marked as Turbo vaporisers (this one https://tinleytech.co.uk/shop/lpg-parts ... o-reducer/ is the forced induction version of this one https://tinleytech.co.uk/shop/lpg-parts ... vaporiser/). The difference being that rather than one side of the diaphragm being open to atmosphere, it is connected to the intake.
That's for a mixer system (where pressurising the backside is the only available compensation for increased air density) - yes?

Gilbertd
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Re: Reducer question.

#4 Post by Gilbertd » Sun Nov 08, 2020 6:19 pm

Yes, that's correct. If you were to use a mixer system on a forced induction engine, you'd have no suck when there was boost so no fuel going in.
96 Saab 900XS, AEB Leo, sold
93 Range Rover 4.2LSE, Lovato LovEco, sold
97 Range Rover 4.0SE, multipoint, sold
98 Ex-Police Range Rover 4.0, AEB Leo, daily motor
96 Range Rover 4.6HSE Ascot, AEB Leo, my spare


Proud member of the YCHJCYA2PDTHFH club.

Pinger
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Posts: 278
Joined: Tue Feb 11, 2020 5:08 pm

Re: Reducer question.

#5 Post by Pinger » Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:27 am

Thanks Gilbertd.
I didn't know a 'blow through' turbo system was possible but obvious now how it can be. Well aware of the danger associated with a 'suck through' system though!

Gilbertd
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Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2008 10:00 am
Location: Peterborough

Re: Reducer question.

#6 Post by Gilbertd » Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:51 am

Have a read of this http://www.turbominis.co.uk/forums/inde ... tid=378624. Robert came on here later in the project when he converted it to injection but his earlier version was a turbocharged engine with single point.
96 Saab 900XS, AEB Leo, sold
93 Range Rover 4.2LSE, Lovato LovEco, sold
97 Range Rover 4.0SE, multipoint, sold
98 Ex-Police Range Rover 4.0, AEB Leo, daily motor
96 Range Rover 4.6HSE Ascot, AEB Leo, my spare


Proud member of the YCHJCYA2PDTHFH club.

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