Flashlube splitter

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Luke201288
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Flashlube splitter

#1 Post by Luke201288 »

Hi I'm looking for a little advice about fitting a valve lube splitter to my Mazda that I'm converting, I did a training course at tinley tech a couple of years ago because I was wanting to fit LPG conversions on some of the campervans I do, I build campervans by trade, in Huddersfield West Yorkshire (properly, not one of the latest home build converters that are jumping on the bandwagon recently, I do conversions for one of the big well known companies near me too so I can't be that bad at it 😃).
Before I started doing campervans many moons ago I was a mechanic so I also know my way round an engine, I also obviously have worked with gas with the campervans so I understand gas fittings etc too, I was actually booked on the NCC course to become fully qualified in the habitation side of gas so I can do all the certificates etc but lockdown happened 🙄 and I've not had a chance to get booked back on it.
Anyway the course was pretty good and the bloke who held it seemed to know his stuff, but unfortunately it was regularly interrupted by a bloke who was as you guys seem to call a done in a day fitter who thought he was booked on a course to get in the uklpg register, so there might have been some bits I missed.
Anyway I seem to have got sidetracked here, I'm putting a conversion on my Mazda Bongo Van 1.8, I decided I wanted to do my own cars before jumping on one that someone else will buy to give me a chance to get some experience and try out some different brands of kit, anyway it's not a Bongo Friendee that everyone knows it's just a van with the Bongo name on very common in Japan and Australia (SK82V chassis code F8 engine code) it's been a bit more awkward than I hoped due to the 1.8 been shoehorned into a cabover engine bay.
Sorry for the big kind of introduction but I was wanting a bit of advice on where to drill the inlet spuds for the splitter I've read on here that behind the gas is preferred but as it's a bit of an odd shaped manifold I'm not sure if it would be sufficient as it almost immediately drops straight down after them and there are some large casted lugs on the underneath of the manifold which stops anything going in the centre, I'm trying to add some pictures of the manifold but I'm just getting an error.
Thanks in advance

Brian_H
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#2 Post by Brian_H »

The advice I was given from Simon was to try and get them somewhere where you shouldn't end up will pooling as a possible result (so in a flat or downward part of the manifold rather than upwards).

Don't know what the manifold is like to suggest where would be best, on the couple I've done with valve savers its been fairly close to the gas spud location.

Error is likely to be that the pic is too big - keep them under 2mb and you should be ok there. If your still having issues then if you could confirm what the error says, we can have a look further into it for you.

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#3 Post by Luke201288 »

Thanks for that it just says http error I will try again and see if I can resize it

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#4 Post by Luke201288 »

Yes I've just reasized it down to 1.5mb and it's still giving me a http error

Brian_H
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#5 Post by Brian_H »

Not sure then - As said in PM will have a look, if your stuck email them to me and I will post them, or post them onto another site and link them to here if you prefer.

I've had a look, it seems to reject anything bigger than 1mb. Will check with Dave whats going on there as it says 5mb on the upload page.

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#6 Post by Luke201288 »

Thanks Brian I have sent 2 pictures to your email

Brian_H
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Location: Milton Keynes

Re: Flashlube splitter

#7 Post by Brian_H »

Here you go, had to knock the Size down. Dave is looking at the issue as it should be ok for files upto 5mb in size, but that isn't seeming to be the case.
Attachments
IMG_20220510_132451 resize.jpg
IMG_20220510_132451 resize.jpg (985.66 KiB) Viewed 503 times
IMG_20220510_132451 resize.jpg
IMG_20220510_132451 resize.jpg (1014.24 KiB) Viewed 503 times

Brian_H
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Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:21 pm
Location: Milton Keynes

Re: Flashlube splitter

#8 Post by Brian_H »

Also, it tends to come down to having few options that will work for the required plumbing for the flashlube. A general thing I worked out, was it was more reliable to mark where you wanted to go before taking too much out, as you then know where you can actually get to. I'd try going in somewhere near your spud location, when I've put them in (which has only been a couple of times) its been next to the spud, chosing whichever location will make the spider fit. You have an easier job as its a metal manifold at least there.

Brian_H
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Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:21 pm
Location: Milton Keynes

Re: Flashlube splitter

#9 Post by Brian_H »

You should now be able to upload directly with larger size pics (upto 5mb) as the issue causing the earlier problem has been fixed (at least, it now works when I try it, so hopefully it will for you as well)

Avensist
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#10 Post by Avensist »

Sorry a bit off topic but just wanted to warn about a common issue with that F8 engine. The spark plugs can come loose with vibration and in some case shoots out so do check them at every service to ensure they are tight. My mate back home had a fleet of those and had this issue with number of them.

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#11 Post by Luke201288 »

Thanks for the help and advice Brian, sorry I've not responded I've had a really busy week with little internet time and no time for any of my own jobs, I will get it as close as I can to the spud location and it's good to know that the picture issue is now fixed if I need to upload any more

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#12 Post by Luke201288 »

Avensist, thanks for the heads up on that I will be sure to keep an eye on it, if that's the main common fault they have I'm happy with that as it seems to be a really good engine, out of interest when you say back home where is that as I know there aren't many vehicles over here that use the F8 engine

Avensist
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#13 Post by Avensist »

You're very welcome, I thought I mention that.

That engine is one of those very old fashioned one, initially released as carb fed and later proceeded to have fuel injection. I think the whole design is about 40 years old now, very primitive but simple and tough engine.

Your Bongo in question was also released under Mitsubishi and Nissan brand (re-badged but worth searching for those if you're stuck with spares) and was still in production until 2020 and was the last of Mazda's commercial vehicle range, at which point Mazda decided to pull the plug on the commercials and the current Bongo vans are re-badged Toyota Hiace. And my back home is where that car was built - Japan.

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#14 Post by Luke201288 »

Thanks Avensist, I did a bit of research when I bought it and I also looked at a few of the vanette and delica cargo variants but this Mazda came up and it ticked all the boxes (single rear axle, good condition and mileage etc) I also noticed that the 2010 onwards vans had the later 1.8 engine that was widely used over here by Ford.
Very lucky in cars with Japan, we only have Japanese imports in my house and we don't plan on changing that, I've also got a Daihatsu Atrai (turbo with the EF-DET engine) a Toyota Granvia 3.4 and a MK1 Toyota MR2, then my wife has a Toyota BB

Avensist
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#15 Post by Avensist »

Indeed you're right, the pre 2010 cars had your F8 engine and post 2010 had L8 engine which is the same family with the UK Mazda 6. The said issue is confined to F8 engine. From this SK generation of Bongo, they have dropped the 2 litre and the only petrol was the 1.8 and due to lack of power many were abused which may have contributed to this issue. Full load with full throttle, a bit like what happened when VW had SDI engine on their vans, people used to floor them as opposed to those equipped with TDI engines.

You've got a good choice and selection of fleet in your household. Atrai flies, a very nippy motor with EF-DET! Good Granvia choice too. Most went for the 3 litre 1KZ-TE diesel, which suffers from head cracking issue so your 3.4 litre 5VZ is the best choice of all. AW11 is another classic.

Good selection of cars from the best era in terms of reliability. Anything after that, all the complexity and cost cutting resulted in reduced reliability even for Toyotas.

Luke201288
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#16 Post by Luke201288 »

Yes I'm very happy with my current cars now, in regards to the Granvia I believe the 5VZ is the only one to have the 2.7 3RZ in the pre-facelift was very underpowered and the 3.0 1KZ wasn't a great deal better on fuel than the V6 as well as the head cracking problem you mentioned, this seems to be a problem on the majority of the Japanese diesels though, I had an Estima with the 3cte in before the Granvia and this had a cracked head at one point, I've also had a Mitsubishi delica 4m40 with the same problem, and then everyone knows about the diesel bongos.
The Atrai is an excellent car, I've had a lot of cars in my driving years and it's by far my favourite. When I was buying it I was looking at a Tanto but we had just found out that my wife was pregnant back then so I figured the Atrai would be more practical, which it has proven to be very practical as a family car in the past 2 or 3 years, in fact we found it had a lot more room for my daughter's car seat and more comfortable for family duties than the Honda CRV that my wife had before the BB which really doesn't add up and shouldn't be true. Everyone seems to really like the Atrai too which came as a surprise, I took it to japshow at Santa Pod at the weekend and loads of people were coming to talk to me about it one after another

Avensist
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Re: Flashlube splitter

#17 Post by Avensist »

The Jap diesels are very behind in many ways. The UK started to get harsh against diesels since the diesel gate scandal back in 2016, one of the main point being the air quality issues. The movement against diesels in Japan started as early as 1993 for the same reasons and by early 2000s, many local authorities especially in larger cities refused to register diesel vehicles, since all vehicles must be registered with the local authority where the vehicle is kept unlike the DVLA system we have here.

Consequently diesel cars failing to meet the standards, will either need to be fitted with a DPF to pass the MOT or the registered keeper will need to move out of that district, either way resulted in financial disadvantage. Due to cars being inexpensive compared to the rest of the world, people decided to ditch those diesel cars as cost of after market DPF often exceeded the value of the car. This is the reason why many of those came over to the UK at one point, because those could be bought very cheap.

Historically most diesels in Japan were there, simply because the diesel fuel was, and to an extent still is cheaper than petrol, a bit like the UK back in the 1970s. In other words, the actual consumption may be poor but since the fuel itself is cheap, people bought them.

So, with the emission legislation got tougher, most manufacturer didn't invest in diesels for the domestic market. Hence like those Estimas with very primitive 3C engines were still on the market despite rest of the world, notably the French and Germans have moved onto common rail direct injections technologies.

Plus those primitive diesel engines are not designed to keep up with the motorway speeds we have over here in the UK. Certainly not for towing things but people subject those to that kind of use (or abuse), moreover some are already knackered in some ways which results in cracked head or gasket issues. Most being automatic don't help this issue either.

So all in all you've made the right choice in choosing those cars.

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