Converting a Ford Triton 6.8 litre 362HP V10 to run on LPG.

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MrGorsky
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Re: Converting a Ford Triton 6.8 litre 362HP V10 to run on LPG.

#21 Post by MrGorsky » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:13 am

New rail arrived and fitted. Same error!

The new rail was getting hot to the touch, so I've switched off.

I've now probed the injector connections, and it looks like injectors F and G are being held open. I'm reading a steady voltage of 14.4v for injector F and almost the same for injector G!

I've inspected the loom for cuts or earth faults but it looks perfect to me, so think it's the ECU, I can't think what else it might be.

TT are going to have a look at it early next week, and we'll see what we see....

LPGC
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Re: Converting a Ford Triton 6.8 litre 362HP V10 to run on LPG.

#22 Post by LPGC » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:36 pm

Sorry to read that, that's my 5% off-chance scenario proved to be realised here then.

When these ECU's have an injector output problem it normally involves more than one injector, a set of 2 output channels must share electronic components. Been years since I fitted a 10 cyl AEB ECU (I've converted lots of V10's since then though), I wonder if firmware could be a problem. On older board (maybe B suffix AEB boards) there was a row of little 2 pin semiconductors at one side of the board but only 2 of them on a 4 cyl ECU and only 4 on an 8 cyl ECU, when an ECU had this (your) type of problem there was often scorching on one of these little semicondcutors, years ago I digged into the issue a bit and it seemed these semicondcutors were a special type of diode that flowed only for a specific duration, so I assumed these were there to control the peak and hold situation.

One more check to run, disconnect the ECU from it's multiplug and see if there's still 14.4v at the injectors... Very very unlikely and of course the engine won't run without the LPG ECU plugged in but would rule out the worst loom production error ever! Fit enough LPG systems and eventually you do see the odd loom production errors, I've recently had a dodgy KME loom... On KME a blue black stripe wire goes to the petrol ECU side of the petrol injector cut for cyl4 but blue black stripe is also the colour for earth wiring to solenoids, this loom had the 2 blue black stripe wires mixed up at the back of the ECU's multiplug, took me half an hour to get the gist of what was going on, diagnose the specifics and sort it. Due to the loom error the engine in this case had a misfire even on petrol due to pinj4 getting 12v one side and 12v through the parallel resistance of the solenoid coils when the solenoid outputs was on at the other side. Not many 10cyl ECU's are sold (like I said before I fit 2 x 6 cyl ECUs on V10s) and although it does seem most likely the problem is ECU internal there's a chance it could be the loom.
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MrGorsky
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Re: Converting a Ford Triton 6.8 litre 362HP V10 to run on LPG.

#23 Post by MrGorsky » Wed Jun 12, 2019 6:05 pm

Time to close this thread out!

I've spent most of the day at Tinley Tech with one of their guys testing and probing. It looks like it was the ECU holding injector output F and maybe G to earth causing the injector coil to burn out. The faulty ECU was applying full alternator voltage as soon as the ignition was switched on whether running gas, petrol, cold or hot. This in turn caused errors with the auto calibrate and lots of head scratching for me.

Credit where credit's due, Tinley Tech sorted me out with a replacement ECU and a third injector rail after the bad ECU fried the replacement they sent me through the post! Helped me with diagnosing the problem, fixing it, and doing the calibration and certification etc. I'm very happy with the service I've received from them, and will be happy to use them again. Stuff went wrong with this install through no ones fault, and I feel they went the distance to help get to the bottom of the problem and make sure I got my RV running on gas.

It's all running fine now, as good as on petrol.

Just in case anyone is reading this in the future and they want to know how I did it....

I used a 230 litre tank hung from the chassis rails on the RHS after removing one of the under floor storage bays. Brackets were welded from 50x50x5mm box section to hang the tank, bolted together with M12 nuts and bolts.

The reducer I hung from a bracket at the front RHS of the vehicle forward of the radiators, behind the front grille. I had to relocate the horns to the centre to make room.

The ECU is on a bracket at the far back and LHS of the engine bay behind the coolant reservoir. It's the only space I could find to make keep it away from "water, heat, and electrical interference"'.

I drilled and tapped the spuds in situ, after removing as much of the air intake apparatus as possible. The manifold stayed on, but the plenum, MAF and all the pipework came off for access. First time I've done it in situ, I took my time and it was fine.

I soldered the injector loom for bank 1 at the front of the engine, and for bank 2 at the back. For me it made most sense to do it at these places for access with my soldering iron. I carefully checked wire colours and used my continuity tester to check and double check I was cutting the correct wire!!

Gas injectors are mounted on rubber mounts onnthe inlet manifold. There are a few unused tapped holes I was able to use, and for the rest I made some simple brackets from some thin steel flat bar I had. I have two gas rails from a Y, 5 gas injectors down each side of the engine.

Pipe work is run generally underneath along the chassis rails to the front and then up to the vap. I've put most rubber hoses and wire looms in conduit for neatness and to reduce the electable of chaffing.

It drives perfectly, and tickover is smooth as on petrol. Nice.

LPGC
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Re: Converting a Ford Triton 6.8 litre 362HP V10 to run on LPG.

#24 Post by LPGC » Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:12 pm

Very good, well done :-)

I've converted loads of V10 RV's (and of course V8's), on V10's with a bit of a bonnet (where you access the front of the engine via the bonnet and access the rear of the engine via cover inside) the nearside (foreign drivers side) wing area is usually a good area to mount the reducer, or on those without a bonnet (where engine is best accessed entirely from inside) a good place is usually on the offside chassis rail. Available tank options etc depend on the design of the specific model of RV.

On California imports the little stickers with wording to the effect you're not allowed to remove the engine to fit in a vehicle under X weight make me laugh!
Full time LPG installer
Servicing / Diagnostics / Repairs to all systems / DIY conversion kits supplied with thorough tech support
Mid Yorkshire
2 miles A1, 8 miles M62,
http://www.Lpgc.co.uk
Twitter https://twitter.com/AutogasSimon
07816237240

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