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 Post subject: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2015 8:31 pm 
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Just converted this XJR -

I don't often bother taking any pics, have done so in this case because I have linked to this from another forum thread where someone is converting another supercharged straight 6 engine.

Pics with job almost done, already road tested, calibrated and running great with performance and drive-ability indistinguishable from petrol. No petrol addition except where gas temp is below 7 degrees (only time petrol addition will occur is when booting it immediately after change-over from first start up a cold morning).

Image[/URL]

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MJ injectors without nozzles fed at 1.1 bar. Engine Pinj peak is 20ms at engine torque peak but petrol injectors can momentarily go full duty on quickly accelerating engine rpm such as during kickdown... full duration aspect means it is even more critical than usual to get multiplier of 1 at full duty with correct mixture.

Reducer has 2 outlets, each outlet feeds one injector rail, balance pipe fitted between rails to ensure equal pressure to rails.
Pipe lengths between injector outlets and spuds varies between 1.5 inches and 3 inches...

I know this install looks pretty old-skool sequential - On none SC XJ's I (and probably we all) would fit the reducer where cruise control unit is. Cruise control on the SC model is in the way for that due to the SC's extra plenum bit on the engine. Could have moved the CC to allow shorter coolant and gas pipes (like I used to on Ford Explorers years ago) and could have removed the wires between ECU and engine from the plastic sheaths and instead cloth taped up.. but reckon the owner would rather keep CC in standard location and will probably be looking at removing the system and fitting it to another vehicle in future. Any of the above would have made moving the system more difficult and there's nothing wrong with it as is if we forgive the long coolant pipes!

Simon

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 6:44 am 
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Hi Simon,

Yep, that's my car.

Image

Performance is exactly as it was on Petrol, I tried it on the way home! :mrgreen:

I noticed on the way back home the LPG gauge was flashing a blue warning light, I assumed this was low gas pressure and it had switched back to petrol as it was on reserve and I was booting it coming off roundabouts!

Is there supposed to be an audible warning when low gas pressure forces a switch back to petrol?

Great install anyway, just the gauge is in a slightly awkward position, might have to shift it to somewhere I don't have to tilt my head to see it!


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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 1:48 pm 
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Hi Andy, that's the one...

Unusual that the buzzer doesn't work, will sort that tomorrow and can move the switch at same time.

Will have used most of the £20 of gas I put in giving it quite a few flat out runs myself during calibration. Didn't cut back during my testing and I expect that will have been due to low tank level / fuel slosh, particularly if it occurred booting it off a roundabout and particularly if that was at the tail end of your trip home

See you tomorrow mate,

Simon

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 2:16 pm 
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LPGC wrote:
Will have used most of the £20 of gas I put in
Only £20? How do you check that the tank fill shutoff is working properly without filling it to the top? Cheapskate.......

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 8:52 pm 
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Gilbertd wrote:
LPGC wrote:
Will have used most of the £20 of gas I put in
Only £20? How do you check that the tank fill shutoff is working properly without filling it to the top? Cheapskate.......


:lol: Same way as other installers - I don't.. But I do usually put around half a tank in and most don't.. and thorough calibration is better than autocal. Those that promise a full tank would be left a bit out of pocket when converting big stuff with multiple tanks that might hold 400 litres, not that they'd have experienced converting anything like that.

Simon

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2015 10:27 am 
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You're always telling us no-one else works to your standards, so accept it here too. Some of us do always fill a new conversion, verifying capacity and fillstop action. That's a lot easier if you have your own pump of course.
It's not a margins issue for us, cost appears on the bill as explained to the customer from the start. Folk would have to be dim to think they were getting 'free fuel', whether it gets itemised on the bill or not.

Really it's just somewhere else where the customer has to compare what he is getting in a supplier quote, and this isn't easy.

But you are quite right, we've never done a 400L capacity setup. I picture this little trailer behind a Smart car ...

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Sun Oct 25, 2015 11:37 am 
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rossko wrote:
You're always telling us no-one else works to your standards
Am I? Where?
rossko wrote:
|So accept it here too
Accept what?
rossko wrote:
Some of us do always fill a new conversion, verifying capacity and fillstop action. That's a lot easier if you have your own pump of course.
A small minority of installers fill tanks (and make a few extra quid on the gas?). No correlation between good/bad installers there? My nearest fill place is 2 miles away, open 24 hours, the drive there following install warms the engine nicely ready for calibration and is a good opportunity to re-check water levels etc after a bit of a drive.
When was the last time the fill-stop didn't work on a new valve you'd fitted (never known one not to work that has passed a visual check - cam working on valve)? Following calibration I have a good idea how much gas the tank should accept and can advise the owner even if they go to fill by themselves.
Suppose you (or customer) filled a tank and it went over capacity - what then? Your options would be the same as mine at this point anyway (got to get gas out of the tank either by using it or wasting it). All that needs to happen is to ask the customer how much gas they managed to put in and if they manage to put too much in this needs to be addressed. You could 1 drive the car yourself to empty the tank, 2 and/or tell the customer to drive the car to empty the tank but not put any more gas in when the tank is empty but return to you to sort the valve (ooer leaving the car potentially unsafe in the meantime eh), 3 vent the gas to atmosphere somewhere, 4 if you have a really useful pump (not an onsite refuelling pump) you could drain the tank to another empty tank but do you have that facility? At the moment I would go with 2 but am getting facility to be able to do 4.. What would you do?
rossko wrote:
But you are quite right, we've never done a 400L capacity setup. I picture this little trailer behind a Smart car ...
Never fitted tanks in a trailer for a Smart car (great range I suppose :lol: ) but have fitted over 400L net capacity to RVs many times. In some cases owner has said 'I'll be filling tanks after next pay day'... In this situation would you insist the customer allowed you to fill tanks and charge for gas, do the install and not fill tanks or refuse to do the install?
rossko wrote:
Really it's just somewhere else where the customer has to compare what he is getting in a supplier quote, and this isn't easy.
Yes, but my customers do get some free gas.. :wink:

I reckon there are many aspects to standard of install - Safety is one aspect that most installers, any half decent installer, gets right and checking fill stops is not a big deal, not something most of even the best installers do (and UKLPG staff don't insist vehicles are presented with empty tank so they can take them to fill to check fill-stop.. they may ask owners how much gas they can get in the tank from empty - like I do). Security of parts fitted. Neatness. Then we get into the more technical stuff like choosing correct components in the first place. Installing components not only securely and neatly but also in correct locations (mostly relevant to injectors). Here's a biggy, probably the crunch - Understanding why certain components / combinations of components suit a particular vehicle better than others, which takes experience / knowledge of a wide range of components etc. Calibration. If half decent installers all do safety, security and neat installs similarly then it is the latter points on the list that differentiate between decent installers. There seems to be a lot more installers, even decent ones, prepared to talk about the former points on the list than the latter. Safety is the most important aspect but is simple, the most interesting points and those which make the biggest difference on more challenging installs are the latter points. Any half decent installer can get a P38 running nicely, not all safe / usually decent installers would get great results on something more challenging like an M5 or modern supercharged V8 Merc. I don't think I am unique in getting installs right on demanding vehicles (told Gilbert in a PM ages ago of one installer I think is equally as good as me - an installer who knows his stuff) but there aren't many installers I would expect to achieve as good results as myself on some challenging installs. Your comment on 'standard of install' probably picks up on my views spelled out here.. Not arrogance but confidence, I know my job and get results on everything I convert while doing more than my share of demanding stuff.

Simon

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Mon Oct 26, 2015 12:43 am 
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Okay, so you don't bother.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2015 3:28 pm 
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The fill cut-off does work. I get just over 60 litres in the tank, which is about right for a 78 litre tank.

I've been to Coventry and North Wales (from Sheffield) at the weekend and can appreciate the 50% drop in fuel costs!


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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 12:32 pm 
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rossko wrote:
Okay, so you don't bother.

I do bother to ensure fill stops work but not directly/personally. As explained above, this is achieved in the usual installer way (I would hope) of advising the customer how much the tank should hold and, if it seems possible to fill above that level by X margin, not to fill further but to bring back to me for the problem to be addressed... Never happened because fill stop issues don't occur on new installs.

A point in favour of my method over yours is that should a problem with the fill stop occur over time (suppose in several years the float were to drop off the valve thus disabling the fill stop - also never happened), my customers are likely to be more aware that filling to more than usual capacity is a problem not an advantage. Of course, you could say that you also advise customers that should they ever seem to be able to put more gas in than you advise they should bring the vehicle back for repair... Then I could reply, ahh so you do think my method (same as the majority of installers method) works then :wink:

:roll: Your most recent picking at straws attempt at scoring safety points debunked.. If really so paranoid, could charge a bit more for installs to cover costs of stalking customers following an install ( :lol: ) so you could see how much gas they manage to get in the tank at every fill, maybe sneak up to pull the bonnet and disconnect gas pipes to ensure tank shut off solenoid, vapour shut off solenoid, reducer diagphram and injector seals are all functioning too - even if parts have been checked at the factory... But we all offer a 1000 mile check, where we can personally/directly check these points, but still can only ask the customer how much gas they have been managing to get in the tank. Thoroughly debunked.

Sad to think but I might guess the latest poke at me stems from not liking my advice on '500bhp 6 cyl' thread where I advised single MJ injectors would be up to the job (this thread seeming to confirm that), you advised maybe fitting 2 injectors per cylinder with possible downside being destroying the LPG ECU? This thread may also have prompted Gilbert your mate (sorry you don't like being called mates but do tend to go around in pairs on the forum) to start the 'to all those who think a power loss on LPG is normal' thread (right after Andy said his XJR I converted is just as powerful on LPG as petrol)? Would hope not, both would be childish, I prefer to give you both the benefit of doubt and think you're both on a bit of a wind-up mission - in which case I can see the funny side..

Would hope that as fairly well known competent installers we could take safety as read when discussing between ourselves, particularly on installs where there is nothing particularly out of the ordinary. This install doesn't involve the tank mounted on the roof of a VW T25, in a boat or in a Challenger tank, it involves a pretty standard tank install in the boot of a Jag. I'd find tech talk between us installers far more interesting.

One of the most dangerous issues affecting installs doesn't involve fill stops, piping, venting, parts security etc, doesn't involve anything that would be noticed during an in shop vehicle inspection of any type... The issue I'm talking about: How often have you been presented with a vehicle to service / repair and the owner says 'It seems to run well most of the time, just occasionally cuts out when approaching roundabouts on deceleration - not too bad if I'm driving but if the wife is driving it can be hairy for her because when the engine dies she loses the power steering and the brakes are harder to press'. To prevent this kind of issue the installer needs to be good in a technical sense, being over zealous on mechanical common sense and COP11 aspects not something that could prevent this kind of issue.

AndyPandy088 wrote:
The fill cut-off does work. I get just over 60 litres in the tank, which is about right for a 78 litre tank.

I've been to Coventry and North Wales (from Sheffield) at the weekend and can appreciate the 50% drop in fuel costs!
Great stuff Andy, thanks for saying. Would appreciate if you'd confirm I advised you could return after doing 1000 miles so I could give the install a check-over and further calibrate the LPG gauge based on your comments on miles per light on the gauge.. :wink:

Simon

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Last edited by LPGC on Wed Oct 28, 2015 1:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 1:21 pm 
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LPGC wrote:
Sad to think but I might guess the latest poke at me stems from not liking my advice on '500bhp 6 cyl' thread where I advised single MJ injectors would be up to the job (this thread seeming to confirm that), you advised maybe fitting 2 injectors per cylinder with possible downside being destroying the LPG ECU?
Personally I wondered why you had linked to this thread in the other one. The other thread is talking about converting a 6 cylinder engine producing 500 bhp so, as an example of what can be done, you show a conversion on a 6 cylinder engine producing a comparatively mere 315 bhp. Just because it works on the Jag, would it still work on an engine producing almost 30% more power? I couldn't really see the connection between the two.
LPGC wrote:
This thread may also have prompted Gilbert your mate (sorry you don't like being called mates but do tend to go around in pairs on the forum) to start the 'to all those who think a power loss on LPG is normal' thread (right after Andy said his XJR I converted is just as powerful on LPG as petrol)?
Nothing of the sort and I didn't consider it to be connected with any existing thread or I would have simply added to that. I saw the video linked from another totally unconnected website (in a discussion about cars that look completely innocent on the outside but are capable of performance way beyond what the appearance suggests) and as soon as I saw that it was running on LPG thought that here was a good example to show to the numerous people that come on here that have been told to expect a loss in performance on gas, and accept it as normal, because they've been sold an inadequate system. We all know that isn't true but there's an awful lot of people out there that don't. When I bought my LSE the previous owner told me to press the button to switch over to petrol if I wanted to overtake because you get less power on gas. He'd had the car for over 4 years and had accepted that as normal. He was astounded when I saw him a few weeks later after I'd sorted the system and showed him that it would now rev to the red line in any gear on LPG.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 2:34 pm 
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Gilbertd wrote:
LPGC wrote:
Sad to think but I might guess the latest poke at me stems from not liking my advice on '500bhp 6 cyl' thread where I advised single MJ injectors would be up to the job (this thread seeming to confirm that), you advised maybe fitting 2 injectors per cylinder with possible downside being destroying the LPG ECU?
Personally I wondered why you had linked to this thread in the other one. The other thread is talking about converting a 6 cylinder engine producing 500 bhp so, as an example of what can be done, you show a conversion on a 6 cylinder engine producing a comparatively mere 315 bhp. Just because it works on the Jag, would it still work on an engine producing almost 30% more power? I couldn't really see the connection between the two.
'Personally I wondered why you had linked' Reading that, some might be even more inclined to think you had a go at me because you thought I was having a go at your mate :wink: but judgement still reserved (I've cleared that up below, not guilty verdict :lol: ). I linked to this thread from the 500bhp thread because I think this will be of interest to the OP on the 500bhp thread and because it helps make the point to others that big power on LPG isn't a problem. And admittedly so I could stroke my eyebrows a bit :lol: This supercharged 6pot is running at 1.1 bar for 315bhp with MJ injectors... Not picking points here but 500bhp is near 60% more than 315bhp - Given what I already knew about MJ performance would fully expect them to deliver enough fuel for the 500bhp 6pot with around 60% more pressure than the 1.1 bar that correctly fuels the 315bhp, so that would be just under 1.8 bar. 1.8Bar is within range of many reducers that are capable of flowing enough gas for more than 300bhp each (fit 2). The OP on 500bhp thread seems to have confirmed my thoughts with his results with reducers that I would have expected less capable than required - perhaps more of a credit to MJ injector performance.
Gilbertd wrote:
LPGC wrote: wrote:
This thread may also have prompted Gilbert your mate (sorry you don't like being called mates but do tend to go around in pairs on the forum) to start the 'to all those who think a power loss on LPG is normal' thread (right after Andy said his XJR I converted is just as powerful on LPG as petrol)?

Nothing of the sort and I didn't consider it to be connected with any existing thread or I would have simply added to that. I saw the video linked from another totally unconnected website (in a discussion about cars that look completely innocent on the outside but are capable of performance way beyond what the appearance suggests) and as soon as I saw that it was running on LPG thought that here was a good example to show to the numerous people that come on here that have been told to expect a loss in performance on gas, and accept it as normal, because they've been sold an inadequate system. We all know that isn't true but there's an awful lot of people out there that don't. When I bought my LSE the previous owner told me to press the button to switch over to petrol if I wanted to overtake because you get less power on gas. He'd had the car for over 4 years and had accepted that as normal. He was astounded when I saw him a few weeks later after I'd sorted the system and showed him that it would now rev to the red line in any gear on LPG.
Ahh all good then! I hoped something like that would be the case and do believe you, sorry for expressing doubt.. Now I see your thought process makes sense, good points to have made which I agree with.

Simon

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 5:48 pm 
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LPGC wrote:
Great stuff Andy, thanks for saying. Would appreciate if you'd confirm I advised you could return after doing 1000 miles so I could give the install a check-over and further calibrate the LPG gauge based on your comments on miles per light on the gauge.. :wink:

Simon


Yep, can confirm that you mentioned a 1000 mile check up and calibration of the meter if needed. Honestly don't think it does though, once the red light comes on I know its getting pretty low and on my long journeys at the weekend the green lights went out one by one throughout the day at the distances I would expect them to.

Oh and the switch back to petrol does now sound the buzzer continually until you press the button to shut it up!


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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2015 8:14 pm 
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Pages of guff, translated to "I let my conversions out with my fingers crossed". You can't paint it up as something for the customers comfort and convenience. Look, you made your business decision; save a trip to the filling station, let the customer bear the costs for any wastage should there be a problem. That is all that prevents you making a simple function check, nothing else. Not politics, nor educating the user, that is just guff.
You accept the risk that they might be back with a problem, judging that it is a small risk, rather than than ensuring for yourself that there won't be a problem beforehand. That's a professionalism issue for me but clearly it isn't for you.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:45 am 
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Out of interest, seeing as the argument appears to be over testing the tank fill stop... How many times have you found one that doesn't work?

That's a question open to any installer.


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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2015 10:56 am 
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The argument is over Simon's attitude. He laughingly says that no other installer makes this simple check, that simply isn't true.

Comparing "scores" is a bit tricky, Catch-22 style - Simon has never known a new fillstop fail ... trouble is he doesn't check them.

I've had exactly two on new installs (in over a decade), and a right pain the backside too, because of wastage of tank contents etc. as Simon rightly points out. That is the installers's problem with his faulty parts, not the customers. Doesn't seem a good reason to decide whether or not to test. Again as Simon points out, the best time to do this test is before delivery, it's the only sensible opportunity.

Welcome input from other installers. There is a lot of "all installers", "most installers", "a minority of installers" bandied about without any real basis. My guess is that there will be no other comment. To take a leaf out of Simon's book, a tiny minority of installers ever read this forum, far less comment in it.

As an end user, how would you expect to find out that there was a fillstop problem? What would you expect to happen as the consequences of a problem here?

This might be trickier, you still have to deal with the man. I haven't previously mentioned 'safety', but as Simon introduced it, how do you feel about performing your own safety check after delivery - happy with "it's never gone wrong so far ... that I know of"? Why do you think he only put £20 fuel in, was it to do you a favour?

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:25 am 
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rossko wrote:
As an end user, how would you expect to find out that there was a fillstop problem? What would you expect to happen as the consequences of a problem here?

This might be trickier, you still have to deal with the man. I haven't previously mentioned 'safety', but as Simon introduced it, how do you feel about performing your own safety check after delivery - happy with "it's never gone wrong so far ... that I know of"? Why do you think he only put £20 fuel in, was it to do you a favour?


I've been driving LPG cars for the last 6 years or so, so I knew what to expect when filling up from an empty tank for the first time. I was keeping an eye on the quantity at the pump and if it went significantly over the 80% value for this tank (around 62 litres) I'd be taking it back to Simon for some adjustments.

The 2nd point about doing my own safety check, personally it doesn't bother me but I can see how it might other people.
I'm fairly handy with cars & computers and have diagnosed and fixed LPG systems on Jags before but wouldn't consider myself an expert, Simon knew this from our conversations before he did the install on my car and is perhaps the reason he didn't test the fill stop; because he knew i'd spot it immediately if there was a problem.


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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 10:27 am 
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No, he told us himself he usually puts half a tank in, and never fills it.

I am envious of your car by the way - a 'proper' (6-cyl) XJ with all that oomph.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:56 am 
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Have a look at this thread. http://www.lpgforum.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=33&t=13082&start=0&hilit=litres

Like Rosko says there are few installers that frequent this forum... Rosko, myself, Dai, Tubbs, occassionally Andy. Tubbs started the above thread I linked to on the the specific subject of how much gas installers put in tanks and is the first to answer his own question, saying he usually puts 30-40 litres in. On top of that, Tubbs posts to mention what he considers to be a potential negative of filling tanks to the top. Dai won't mind me saying that he doesn't fill tanks, I don't fill tanks, I don't know about Andy, let's give Rosko the benefit of doubt and reckon Andy does. So 3/5 of us don't fill tanks (or 4/5 of us if Andy doesn't).

Rosko, you didn't post much of a negative against others on the thread I linked to that don't fill tanks to the top... Was that because, at the time, it was somebody you are a bit more friendly with saying how much gas they put in the tank, and/or because you didn't think the point much of an issue?

If we asked all installers if they fill tanks to the top, most of them would say they didn't. You are in the minority, your picking at straws comments about my practices would be equally applicable to those installers that you generally get on well with.

I reckon I know why we don't get on... When I first joined the forum I asked why installers, who all usually pick faults with overly long injector pipe runs, seem to think P38's with Bosch manifold are an exception in that respect. I didn't know that you sell P38 DIY kits and so are probably more guilty of fitting and advising long pipe runs on those vehicles than others.. Then I started the UKLPG thread and you turned out to be a hardline supporter of UKLPG. No matter how many times I've thought well we're all blokes here and the blokey thing to do is move on after an argument, you've always brought it back to the above and continue to pick unrealistic faults with me wherever you think possible. I make a lot of technical points on the forum - If you so like to pick fault with me would expect you to pick faults in both safety and technical matters, yet you only pick faults on safety matters...

If you have just become much more opinionated regards how much gas we put in tanks since posting on the specific thread on that subject, could always ask the moderators to move comments on how much gas we put in tanks from this thread to that one.. Both our viewpoints would be shown to be consistent, mine probably more so than yours (you sometimes showed customers how to fill up back then?).. but your view would clearly have become much stronger since you posted on the linked thread and me mentioning in passing on this thread how much gas I put in a tank.

We all do safety mate. A bloke who continually checks his shoelaces are fastened could make a very difficult to argue against case that he is safer than a more sensible bloke who doesn't continually feel the need to check his shoelaces. He could still make the same point even if he didn't really understand which shoe went on which foot.

rossko wrote:
The argument is over Simon's attitude. He laughingly says that no other installer makes this simple check, that simply isn't true.
I didn't say that, I said the majority don't. Now I'll add including your mate.

rossko wrote:
I've had exactly two on new installs (in over a decade), and a right pain the backside too, because of wastage of tank contents etc. as Simon rightly points out. That is the installers's problem with his faulty parts, not the customers. Doesn't seem a good reason to decide whether or not to test. Again as Simon points out, the best time to do this test is before delivery, it's the only sensible opportunity.
I didn't mention it but I do check fill stops on vertical toroidal valves, because I have had 2 of those not work. Vertical toroidal valves have the float at the end of a really long dangly bit of wire and can take some sideways adjustment to prevent grating against the side of the tank. You can bet your backside that if I had problems with other valves I would do the same for those types too, but I haven't. I do fill every tank with a certain Bbrand name valve to the top - I don't fit many of that particular make valve partly because I know they are many times more likely to be problematic than others, maybe you fit a lot more of that brand valve than I do...

rossko wrote:
Welcome input from other installers. There is a lot of "all installers", "most installers", "a minority of installers" bandied about without any real basis. My guess is that there will be no other comment. To take a leaf out of Simon's book, a tiny minority of installers ever read this forum, far less comment in it.
We've already had such comments (on the thread I linked to), the bit of interest that raised among installers mostly agreed with me. Now you've made a big deal out of it, would seem human nature that installers that fill tanks to the top will be far more inclined to post than installers that don't fill tanks to the top like me.

If you had swung my opinion, the only difference I would have to make to my practices would be to put a few more litres in a tank (except of course on those RVs). But I'm not convinced this is what your recent pop at me was really about. On challenging installs I know what parts to fit, how to fit them and how to calibrate them to get results, an installer who doesn't cannot change that situation quite so simply.

Simon

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Last edited by LPGC on Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: XJR Jag
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2015 2:35 pm 
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Gilbertd wrote:
LPGC wrote:
Will have used most of the £20 of gas I put in
Only £20? How do you check that the tank fill shutoff is working properly without filling it to the top? Cheapskate.......
Seems I've started another slanging match with the above comment. I initially wrote "Only £20? Cheapskate" but then added the bit about checking the fill stop, I wish I hadn't now.

Bottom line is this. It is mandatory to have an 80% fill stop. If you were unlucky enough to get the one faulty one in a million and there was a problem, you'd be the one that would have to carry the can and admit that just because all of the other thousands you've fitted have worked, you don't bother to check them. So you may get your wrists slapped, you may even get a fine, but, unless it was the cause of a major incident, things would carry on as normal. Ross is employed as an installer by a company and if the same happened with one of his installs, it wouldn't be him that would carry the can, but his employers. They would probably also get a slap on the wrists or a fine but Ross would probably get a P45 as he would have bought the company into disrepute. An established company would also warrant far more publicity than a one man band too, so the damage to the company, and LPG conversions in general, would be far greater. What one person considers to be an acceptable risk is different from person to person, you consider it to be acceptable to assume a brand new fill stop will work, Ross, or his employers, don't.

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